Earlier this year, Selena Quintanilla was honored with a Google Doodle that made Latinx hearts the world over burst. The doodle debuted on October 17, 2017 – exactly 28 years to the day that her eponymous album, "Selena," was released.

Selena's doodle is unforgettable, but it certainly isn't the only time a Latinx icon has been featured by Google. 

Julio Cortazar

julio cortazar
photo: Google

In August of 2014, Google honored this famous author who's best known for his novel "Rayuela."

Maria Izquierdo

Maria Izquierdo
photo: Google

This Mexican painter was featured as a Google Doodle in honor of her 112th birthday. She broke through when she became the first Mexican woman to have her art featured in the US.

Dercy Goncalves

Dercy Goncalves
photo: Google

If you're a fan of Brazilian movies, you know Dercy Goncalves. The actress holds the record for the longest acting career until her death at the age of 101.

Carmen Costa

Carmen Costa
photo: Google

This bright and beautiful Google Doodle was an exact reflection of Brazilian singer Carmen Costa.

El Santo

El Santo
photo: Google

Rodolfo Guzmán Huerta will always be remembered as the silver-masked luchador who brought popularity to wrestling in Mexico. He's more commonly referred to as "El Santo" and was honored on his 99th birthday last year.

Cecilia Grierson

Cecilia Grierson
photo: Google

This Argentine author became a pioneer for much more than her own written word. She's also the first woman in Argentina to earn a medical degree, which is why she was honored by Google in 2016. 

Chava Flores

Chava Flores
photo: Google

Flores was a musician for the people. His songs are known to have "chronicled urban life in Mexico," according to Google.

Juana Paula Manso

Juana Paula Manso
photo: Google

In the mid-1800s, Manso was one of the first outspoken feminists in Argentina, and possibly worldwide. She challenged societal and cultural norms at a time when she was expected to stay in the home and cook. Manso became a children's book creator and educator who spread her mission to those around her.

Dolores del Río

Dolores del Rio
photo: Google

Del Río can be considered one of the most prominent women in Mexican film to this day. She was an advocate, a trailblazer, and a leading lady setting the scene for all women to follow in her footsteps.

Cora Coralina

photo: Google

Coralina's Google Doodle debuted earlier this year in honor of the Brazilian poet's 128th birthday. She is remembered for her simplistic words that captivated the hearts of thousands in her home country.

Amalia Hernandez

Amalia Hernandez
photo: Google

You can thank Mexican dancer and choreographer Amalia Hernandez for the Ballet Folklorico de Mexico, which still stands today. Hernandez was honored in September for bringing Mexican dance and performance to the forefront of the music scene.

Violeta Parra

Violeta Parra
photo: Google

She was a Chilean writer, activist, and singer, but her work achieved much more than just a few nice songs. Parra is best known for renewing Chilean folk traditions which turned into a movement to fight for social justice in Latin America.

Celia Cruz

celia cruz
photo: Google

The Cuban singer's personality was as big as her hair. This clearly showed in her music, and she quickly became known as the Queen of Salsa. Cruz was honored by Google on her 88th birthday in 2013.

Pedro Infante

Pedro Infante
photo: Google

In November of this year, Infante would have turned 100 years old. Google honored the Mexican singer, actor, and charmer with an interactive doodle that showed his love of boxing, too.

Gloria E. Anzaldúa

Gloria E. Anzaldúa
photo: Google

Her work was more than just words on a page. Anzaldúa was a Chicana, feminist, and queer theorist who focused on the Texas-Mexico border.

Carmen Miranda

carmen miranda
photo: Google

Miranda was a Brazilian triple threat, according to Google, who's best recognized for the "fruit hat" she often wore. 

Selena Quintanilla

selena google doodle
photo: Google

"No matter who you are or where you come from, anything is possible" was the theme of Selena's doodle. She was a singer, role model, and trailblazer for Mexican-Americans whose legacy still stands today.