photo: Marissa Pina, Vivala

If there's one thing most Latinos do (whether we speak Spanish, English, or both) is make up our own words. We have this really funny tendency of taking English words and making it pass for Spanish by adding either an "o” or "ear" behind it. Or how about when we refer to products by a brand name rather than its actual name? You know, like we when we say Kotex instead of pads or sanitary napkins.

But the best part about it is that it's totally acceptable. No one judges, no one corrects you, and no one even remembers that half these words aren't actually part of the Spanish language. It's like we created our very own sub-language that no one but us understands. It's actually kind of cool if you really think about it. So we’ve rounded up a list of words Latinos have shamelessly made up and will probably stick with forever!

Related From Vivala: The Beauty Dictionary for Spanish-Speaking Countries

1

Hanguear

photo: Giphy

It's our Spanglish way of saying "to hang out,” because honestly there isn’t a word in Spanish that means just that.

2

Parquear

photo: Giphy

We say this when we want to say to park, but the correct word is actually estacionar.

3

Full

photo: Giphy

To be full or filled. The actual Spanish word, though, is lleno.

4

Teipe

photo: Giphy

Tape. But no, it should really be cinta.

5

Printear

photo: Giphy

To print. You see what we're saying about adding "ear" behind every English word?

6

Kotex

photo: Giphy

Another popular way of saying pads, but it's really just a sanitary napkins brand.

7

Wacker

photo: Giphy

You know, for Quaker oatmeal.

8

Con Flei

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It means cold cereal in general, but actually stems from the cereal brand Kellogg's Corn Flakes. Classic.

9

Sang-wich

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Why we insist on replacing the "D" in sandwich with a "G" is beyond us, but it's forever stuck.

10

Chilliando

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You know, like when you're chillin’ with your friends.

11

Lun-che

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Sorry to bust your bubble folks but lun-che does not mean lunch. It's almuerzo.

12

Yarda

photo: Giphy

We like to tell ourselves this means yard.

13

Bildin

photo: Giphy

You know, for building? When we're too lazy to just say edificio.

14

Carpeta

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Oh, and adding an "a" behind an English word doesn't make it Spanish either. The correct Spanish translation for carpet is alfombra my peeps. And carpeta actually means folder in Spanish.

15

Bloque

photo: Giphy

Nope, this doesn't actually mean block. The word in Spanish is actually cuadra.And bloque is misused here. It actually means building block.

16

Mopear

photo: Giphy

Good one, but trapear is really how you say “to mop."

17

Troca

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This is supposed to be truck. How funny is this one?

18

Guau

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Wow. No, we really think it means wow.

19

Que cool

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You know, for "How cool?"

20

Yeans

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We mean jeans, but you know we have a tendency for pronouncing our "Js" like "Ys." We can't help it.

21

El coat

photo: Giphy

When Latinos are too lazy to say abrigo (the actual Spanish translation for coat), we throw an el in front of the English word and call it a day.

22

Jung

photo: Giphy

No we aren't referring to a name, we are straight up trying to say "young" in Spanish.

23

Yiu-Tu

photo: Giphy

We refuse to pronounce the "B" when saying YouTube. It's the funniest thing ever.