While promoting her new film, "The Hitman's Bodyguard," Salma Hayek vocalized how hard it has been to be a Latinx actor in the entertainment industry.
salma hayek talks about early career struggles as a Latina actress in the US
photo: splash
Most recently, she pulled out the receipts and revealed that she was told by "Ghostbusters" producer and director Ivan Reitman that a Mexican actress couldn't play a fashion editor. And, unfortunately, she has a book's worth of less-than-positive experiences she went through while trying to make a name for herself as a Mexican woman in Hollywood.

In her latest interview, Hayek explained how people thought her desire to be a crossover Latina actress in the States was a joke.

salma hayek talks about early career struggles as a Latina actress in the US
photo: Splash
She told BET,

"At the very beginning, it was, like, not possible. They would laugh at you. They were laughing at me for wanting to act here because I was a soap star in Mexico and I had to start again as an extra because there was really nothing."

Having to start from the bottom wasn't easy, especially when the community of prominent Latinx actors was virtually nonexistent.

"We were not organized — there was not enough pressure. It was like the smallest community of actors trying to do the impossible. I was not part of them yet and the [acting] parts were very limited, especially for women, and I was the first Mexican getting a lead role since Dolores del Río in 1930 during the time of the silent movies," she added.

"Now there's a lot of us, but not enough. Not enough."

Although she has become one of the most recognized and well-respected Latinas in the business, the Oscar-nominated actress knows that there's still a long way to go in terms of representation.

salma hayek talks about early career struggles as a Latina actress in the US
photo: Splash

"I still do [face struggles as a Latina actress]," she stated.

Her remarks are not surprising as only 5.8% of Latinxs are represented in TV and film even though they make up an estimated 18% of the nation's total population. That's not even tackling the issue of Latinx typecasting. UGH.

This is why it's important for Latinxs to continue speaking out on why Hollywood needs to do better.

We hope they're listening.