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photo: Getty

Salma Hayek's latest passion project, the animated film The Prophet, hits theaters today and even Beyoncé is stoked about it. The Mexican actress serves as a producer for the movie and the voice of Kamila. Hayek's seven-year-old daughter, Valentina, also lends her voice in the French version of the film for the role of Almitra. 

Hayek, who recently posed nude in the August issue of Allure, took a moment in the middle of the press frenzy surrounding the film this week to share her thoughts on a topic that's been all over the news recently thanks to Donald Trump, prejudice against Latinos in the United States. In an interview on Huffpost Live yesterday she revealed how a man in a movie theater once told her to go back to her country. Not one to slink away, Hayek said she came back with, "Not only do I have my citizenship but even before it was America, this was already my country. And if you don’t like it you can move." Here, we highlight a few instances where the outspoken starlet has stood up for women and Latinos.

In the same HuffPost Live interview yesterday she touched on remarks she made about studios not wanting her:

"They don't like somebody who has an opinion on the script. They want a girl to come in and be quiet and look pretty and do as the say, and it's just not in my nature."

In May 2015, while attending the 68th Cannes Film Festival, Hayek told The Telegraph:

"The only kind of film where women make more money than men is porno. It's not funny. Our pay can never go up, because we never get the opportunity to show what we can bring in [in] revenue." 

She penned a piece for Marie Claire in April on body image and said:

"Eventually, after I became an actress in Mexico, I moved to the U.S.and no one would cast me as the leading lady. I could only get parts that were "sexy." It was my way to get into movies, but I resented it a little bit. I wanted people to see that there was more to me. And maybe that's part of the reason I did Frida (2002)."
In March she told The Guardian about Hollywood's reaction to her accent:
"I had studio heads say to me, ‘You could have been the biggest star in America, but you were born in the wrong country. You can never be a leading lady, because we can’t take the risk of you opening your mouth and people thinking of their maids.’”
Below, check out the trailer for her new movie The Prophet.